Rene Thompson

Rene Thompson V1 [ Registered ]

Uiger No. 11794 Member,Joined at 2017-03-06 21:51:12

  • Rene Thompson Recently Comments
  • 1 Years Ago

    Comment to Topic Posted by Rene Thompson › Tahiti History and Culture
  •   Tattoos are another significant aspect of Tahitian culture. Men and women young and old have symbolic tattoos over large parts of their body. In Tahiti, tattoos symbolize social status, bravery, community, and beauty.

      As in many Polynesian islands, native Tahitians are known for wood carvings, especially tikis. Those wishing to explore tiki culture on Hawaii should visit Moorea's Tiki Village, where native Polynesians live in thatched huts and preserve traditional tiki art forms.
  • 1 Years Ago

    Comment to Topic Posted by Rene Thompson › Tahiti History and Culture
  •   During World War I, the island was attacked by two German warships, and a French gunboat and German freighter were sunk in the harbor. Between 1966 and 1996, France conducted nearly 200 nuclear bomb tests on and near the island.

      Today, native Tahitian culture is very much alive. Tahiti is famous for its traditional dance, the otea. Often confused with the hula of Hawaii because of the grass skirts and hip shaking, it is a slower paced, graceful dance focusing on storytelling with the hands. The dance is built around a theme, and tells stories of daily life or legends of the past.
  • 1 Years Ago

    Comment to Topic Posted by Rene Thompson › Tahiti History and Culture
  •   Like many Polynesian islands, contact with Europeans soon brought diseases, missionaries, and cultural change. Introduced diseases killed a major part of the Tahitian population, leaving a population of just 16,000 by 1797. In 1843, France's Admiral Dupetit Thouars, acting on his own initiative, annexed the island. War between the French and the Tahitians continued until 1847, and resulted in the island remaining under French control for many years. Today, French Polynesia, a group of islands that includes Tahiti, is officially known as a semi-autonomous 'French overseas community.' Tahitians are full French citizens, and France is the official language, although the Tahitian language is also in use.
  • 1 Years Ago

    Comment to Topic Posted by Rene Thompson › Tahiti History and Culture
  •   The first European contact with the islanders on Tahiti was in 1767. The most famous visitors from these early years include Captain James Cook in 1769, and the crew of HMS Bounty, who mutinied following their departure from Tahiti in 1789. In 1835, Charles Darwin visited Tahiti on an expedition aboard the HMS Beagle. These early visitors immediately noted the relaxed pace of life on Tahiti, a way of life which continues to the present day.
  • 1 Years Ago

    Comment to Topic Posted by Dominik Hussl › G. Harvey
  •   Write down the advice of him that loves you, though you like it not at present.
  • 1 Years Ago

    Comment to Topic Posted by Rene Thompson › The Meaning Behind Lei Ceremonies
  •   If you are the recipient of a lei, wear it around your neck, on the brim of a hat, or wrapped around your head. If you are a pregnant woman, do not wear the lei around your neck. According to superstition, this symbolizes the umbilical cord tangling. A lei should not be removed when in the presence of the lei giver. Today, there is almost no restriction on the meaning behind a lei. It is given on dozens of different occasions for a wide range of symbolic reasons.
  • 1 Years Ago

    Comment to Topic Posted by Rene Thompson › The Meaning Behind Lei Ceremonies
  •   A lei is a special gift that should be treasured. Each lei has been hand-woven, and it represents a gift of love. Each island has its own designated lei color. Some leis are considered quite rare because they are made from special flowers which are not found in large numbers on the Hawaiian Islands. Receiving such a lei is considered a very high honor; many of these leis are created specifically to adorn the important statues and monuments located throughout the islands.
  • 1 Years Ago

    Comment to Topic Posted by Rene Thompson › The Meaning Behind Lei Ceremonies
  •   The lei can also be seen as a symbol of the “spirit of aloha” that exists in the Hawaiian Islands. ‘Aloha’ is difficult to translate, but it means a greeting, a farewell, love, joy, hope, and other feelings. The beautiful flower lei is seen as a non-verbal expression of aloha. In Hawaii, May Day has been known as “Lei Day” since 1928. Thousands of leis are given on this day. Today, many tourists receive a lei upon their arrival to the Hawaiian islands as a welcoming gesture.
  • 1 Years Ago

    Comment to Topic Posted by Rene Thompson › The Meaning Behind Lei Ceremonies
  •   This traditional Hawaiian gift is given as a symbol of love, respect, or appreciation. Although in centuries past the lei held very specific meanings, today they are given for many varying occasions and reasons. Although not part of the ancient Hawaiian custom, today a kiss on the cheek often accompanies the lei.

      Today, leis are often incorporated into weddings. The couple may exchange leis as a symbol of love and commitment. Before this ceremony, the wedding officiate will hold and bless the leis. Lei ceremonies at weddings can also involve the couple giving leis to family members to symbolize the joining of the two families. In Hawaii or for tropical-themed weddings, leis are worn by the wedding party in place of corsages or boutonnieres. Leis are often given as wedding favors as a symbol of appreciation for supporting the couple on their special day.
  • 1 Years Ago

    Comment to Topic Posted by Rene Thompson › Hei-Tiki or "Maori Tiki"
  •   Traditionally, these figures were carved from nephrite, a green stone also known as pounamu, which is prized by Maori culture for its hardness and beauty. Maori call the South Island of New Zealand 'Te Wai Pounamu,' a reference to this important stone. The stone is used for pendants and other ornamental carvings, as well as for weapons and tools. Often, tools such as rectangular adze blades served as the raw material for these carved figures. First, the stone would be smoothed by rubbing it with an abrasive compound, such as sand. Then, the details would be painstakingly carved using sticks and water, removing as little material as possible. This was very difficult work, given both the primitive tools of the ancient Maori people and the desire to preserve as much of the valuable stone as possible. Finally, the stone is polished and suspended on a cord.
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