Sarah Martin

Sarah Martin V1 [ Registered ]

Uiger No. 10136 Member,Joined at 2017-03-07 06:29:01

  • Sarah Martin Recently Comments
  • 7 Months Ago

    Comment to Topic Posted by Sarah Martin › Restoration (1660-1689)
  •   English tapestry works were opened at Mortlake (1619), a district of London on the south bank of the River Thames, and furnishing accessories of many kinds began to enrich the homes of the well-to-do. This was also the period of the introduction of Oriental objects into England and there occurred amongst the nobility a rage for the collection of Chinese pottery and Oriental tapestries.
  • 7 Months Ago

    Comment to Topic Posted by Sarah Martin › Restoration (1660-1689)
  •   Lacquer and veneer were introduced and marquetry and gilding were more freely used. Gros-point and petit-point, with other fabrics, were used for upholstery and tapestry window toppers. Rich silks, in velvets, brocades and damasks, were woven in England, skilled French weavers joining the trade after the revocation of the Edict of Nantes (1685). The Edict of Nantes was issued by Henry IV of France to give the French Calvinist Protestants certain rights in a mainly Catholic nation. Elaborate fringes and trimmings are found on upholstered pieces of this period.
  • 7 Months Ago

    Comment to Topic Posted by Sarah Martin › Restoration (1660-1689)
  •   There are certain features, however, that are typical, such as those in which the curvilinear structural forms predominate. These are seen in the "S" and "C" curves used in the legs, aprons, backs and arms of chairs. Both oak and walnut were common after the Restoration, with elm, beech and pine used to some extent--mainly for tables, chairs, bed frames, and other furniture.
  • 7 Months Ago

    Comment to Topic Posted by Sarah Martin › Restoration (1660-1689)
  •   Fruit, flowers and game are draped in garlands and swags in over-mantel fireplace surrounds (http://www.ferche.com/), cut in minute detail in lime or boxwood and applied to the wood wall paneling. Furniture took on the lighter continental construction influenced by Flanders as well as France. Many of the early Jacobean forms persisted well into the Restoration period and considerable confusion often results in distinguishing much of the furniture of this time from earlier and later models.
  • 7 Months Ago

    Comment to Topic Posted by Sarah Martin › Restoration (1660-1689)
  •   Academic forms of architecture play a much more important part in mantels, doorways, fireplaces, and window treatments. Grinling Gibbons, the wood-carver, discovered by John Evelyn by chance one day and patronized by the King, became an extremely important influence. His characteristic carvings are in high relief, undercut and of naturalistic forms.
  • 7 Months Ago

    Comment to Topic Posted by Sarah Martin › Renaissance Tapestries
  •   Their early work was mainly of the verdure type, though later they produced all types of subjects. For a time they also manufactured rugs, but this was discontinued at the time of the French Revolution. Their recent output has consisted mainly of small tapestries for furniture coverings, woven on low warp looms, in place of the high warp type formerly used. The looms of Aubusson, in central France, are said to be of very ancient origin. They manufacture both rugs and tapestries, and their work is produced commercially for the general market.
  • 7 Months Ago

    Comment to Topic Posted by Sarah Martin › Renaissance Tapestries
  •   Borders are often imitations of gilt wooden picture frames. Subjects arc usually mythological or historical, replacing the religious subjects of earlier times. Under Louis XV pastoral scenes were very popular, being executed from the designs of Watteau, Boucher, Fragonard, and other popular court painters. Tapestry was also woven in smaller pieces for use in upholstery. The Beauvais tapestry works were at first a private enterprise, but were later taken over by Louis XIV, and are still a government factory.
  • 7 Months Ago

    Comment to Topic Posted by Sarah Martin › Renaissance Tapestries
  •   It was taken over by the French crown and is still owned by the French government, working exclusively for them. Its output during the period of Louis XIV, as contrasted with the Gothic work, is full of relief, with elaborate shadows and fine gradations of color. The tapestries imitate paintings very closely, and have lost much in the way texture and character, but are still rich and decorative, best used on a wall in a classic picture frame or in front of napoleon fireplaces.
  • 7 Months Ago

    Comment to Topic Posted by Sarah Martin › Renaissance Tapestries
  •   The Italian tapestries of the earlier periods were barely distinguishable from the Flemish. Later they assumed a character of their own and in the Baroque period they took on the same characteristics as other contemporary arts. Under Louis XIV and his successors, French tapestry weaving became even more important than the Flemish. This was largely due to the founding of the Gobelin works, in the outskirts of Paris, on the banks of the Bievre River. The river’s water was whose water was said to have exceptional qualities for dyeing. The Gobelin factory developed into one of the greatest producers of this class of work.
  • 7 Months Ago

    Comment to Topic Posted by Sarah Martin › Renaissance Tapestries
  •   It was these weavers who produced the thousands of tapestries of varying merit that are so often sold in the auction market, known as "Flemish Verdures" and which show human beings of strange or extraordinary shapes. Flemish workers were imported into other countries, including Spain, Germany and Italy, though the industry in these countries never assumed very great importance.
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